Vesuvius At Home

Writer reblogs stuff like "feminism" and "cool things Millennials do on the internet". Author of ANGEL FOOD and STONE AND SPRING. Drinks La Croix like no tomorrow.

mayahan:

Monster Cookies

Ingredients

  • 1 White Cake Mix Box
  • 1/2 cup butter softened
  • 1/2 tsp. vanilla
  • 1 8 oz. Cream Cheese Bar softened
  • 1 egg
  • Powdered Sugar
  • Food Coloring
  • Candy Eyeballs

Instructions

  1. Beat butter, vanilla, egg and cream cheese until fluffy.
  2. Mix in cake mix. Divide batter into bowls for the amount of colors you want.
  3. Add food coloring to each individual bowl and mix until all combined.
  4. Chill for 30 minutes.
  5. Roll into balls and dip in a bowl of powdered sugar.
  6. Place on greased cookie sheet and pat down a bit.
  7. Bake at 350 for 10-12 minutes
  8. Add candy eyeballs while cookies are still warm. ENJOY!

Source: http://lilluna.com/gooey-monster-cookies/

(via theinnkeeperlibrarian)

gwydtheunusual:

vieralynn:

phoenixfloaz:

The Scully EffectOne of the most frustrating aspects of this scarcity is that we know just how significant an influence powerful female, scientist role models can have on young women.Perhaps the most prominent example of this power has come to be known as the “Scully Effect.” Named for Special Agent Dana Scully, the medical doctor and FBI agent who was one half of the investigative team on “The X-Files”, the Scully Effect accounts for the notable increase in women who pursued careers in science, medicine, and law enforcement as a result of living with Dana Scully over the nine years “The X-Files” ran on Fox.The show has been off the air for more than a decade. Yet the character of Dana Scully remains a powerful example of how a dynamic female character whose primary pursuit is science—not romantic relationships—can have a lasting impact on our culture.
— by Christopher Zumski Finke (x)

The rest of the article this is from is a good read:
Less “Big Bang Theory,” More Dana Scully: What It’s Going to Take to Lead More Girls Into Science — Only 25 percent of STEM jobs are held by women. YouTube science sensation Emily Graslie on how we can inspire them with better-quality pop-culture role models.

gilliandersob- Saw this and thought you would probably appreciate it. 

gwydtheunusual:

vieralynn:

phoenixfloaz:

The Scully Effect

One of the most frustrating aspects of this scarcity is that we know just how significant an influence powerful female, scientist role models can have on young women.

Perhaps the most prominent example of this power has come to be known as the “Scully Effect.” Named for Special Agent Dana Scully, the medical doctor and FBI agent who was one half of the investigative team on “The X-Files”, the Scully Effect accounts for the notable increase in women who pursued careers in science, medicine, and law enforcement as a result of living with Dana Scully over the nine years “The X-Files” ran on Fox.

The show has been off the air for more than a decade. Yet the character of Dana Scully remains a powerful example of how a dynamic female character whose primary pursuit is science—not romantic relationships—can have a lasting impact on our culture.

— by Christopher Zumski Finke (x)

The rest of the article this is from is a good read:

Less “Big Bang Theory,” More Dana Scully: What It’s Going to Take to Lead More Girls Into ScienceOnly 25 percent of STEM jobs are held by women. YouTube science sensation Emily Graslie on how we can inspire them with better-quality pop-culture role models.

gilliandersob- Saw this and thought you would probably appreciate it. 

(via theinnkeeperlibrarian)

Jack the Ripper didn’t kill sex workers: he killed women, some of whom sold sex sometimes. Jack killed flower sellers. Jack killed charwomen. He killed mothers, daughters, sisters, and wives. The case files that Ripper historians scrutinise for clues about his identity contain extraordinary details about these women’s ordinary and fascinating lives.

From these files, I learned about their friends, their lovers and their children; their love of drink, their quick tempers, and their favourite songs. I have seen pictures of their dead faces, and read coroners’ reports about the weight of their lungs, livers and hearts. These women are infinitely more interesting to me than the identity of their killer. Finding out about their poverty, their work and their experiences of injustice and inequality is far more important than their killer’s DNA. They are the real story of the Whitechapel murders. It is time for popular history to think more about them, and less about Jack.

boyirl:

Eliza Bennett - A woman’s work is never done, 2011Using my own hand as a base material, I considered it a canvas upon which I stitched into the top layer of skin using thread to create the appearance of an incredibly work worn hand. By using the technique of embroidery, traditionally employed to represent femininity and applying it to the expression of it’s opposite, I hope to challenge the pre-conceived notion that ‘women’s work’ is light and easy. Aiming to represent the effects of hard work arising from employment in low paid ancillary jobs such as cleaning, caring, and catering, all traditionally considered to be ‘women’s work’.

boyirl:

Eliza Bennett - A woman’s work is never done, 2011

Using my own hand as a base material, I considered it a canvas upon which I stitched into the top layer of skin using thread to create the appearance of an incredibly work worn hand. By using the technique of embroidery, traditionally employed to represent femininity and applying it to the expression of it’s opposite, I hope to challenge the pre-conceived notion that ‘women’s work’ is light and easy. Aiming to represent the effects of hard work arising from employment in low paid ancillary jobs such as cleaning, caring, and catering, all traditionally considered to be ‘women’s work’.

(via theinnkeeperlibrarian)